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nuanced-subversion:
"One of the supposed characteristics of primitive peoples was that we could not use our minds or our intellects. We could not invent things, we could not create institutions or history, we could not imagine, we could not produce anything of value…we did not practice the ‘arts’ of civilization. By lacking such virtues we disqualified ourselves, not just from civilization but from humanity itself. In other words we were not ‘fully human’…Imperialism provided the means through which concepts of what counts as human could be applied systematically as forms of classification…In conjunction with imperial power and with ‘science’, these classification systems came to shape relations between imperial powers and indigenous societies.
The European powers had by the nineteenth century already established systems of rule and forms of social relations which governed interaction with the indigenous peoples being colonized. These relations were gendered, hierarchical and supported by rules, some explicit and others masked or hidden. The principle of ‘humanity’ was one way in which the implicit or hidden rules could be shaped. To consider indigenous peoples as not fully human, or not human at all, enabled distance to be maintained and justified various policies of either extermination or domestication.”
— Linda Tuhiwai Smith | Decolonizing Methodologies

socialismartnature:

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voguishpsychosis:

arcadeace:

IsraHELL’s attacks on Gaza, Ramadhan 2014. May they root in HELL.

these cartoons are perfect

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ourafrica:

On this day in the year 1925, Patrice Émery Lumumba was born.

He was the first democratically elected prime minister of the Republic of Congo. He founded the “Mouvment national congolais” party and with that successfully helped his country gain independence from Belgium in 1960.

He was however executed a year later.  It is important to note that The United States (The CIA to be exact), Belgium and the United Kingdom were all involved in his death. 

Rest in Power.

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Heart Health

A study published in February 2009 journal of hypertension suggests that black tea consumption can conduce to a healthier heart. The research conducted on 19 healthy men revealed that drinking black tea over long periods helps increase blood vessel re-activity  while reducing arterial stiffness and blood pressure. This in turn enhances a healthy heart condition.

Soothes Stress

According to a new study conducted by University College London (UCL) researchers, it is stated that having a cup of black tea daily can help counter the everyday stress of life. In this research, people who drank black tea four times a day for six weeks were found to have lower levels of cortisol (stress hormone) in their bloodstream after a trying event. Thus, black tea is seen to have effect on the stress hormones in the body. However, researchers are yet to find out which are the ingredients in tea that cause the relaxing and de-stressing effect in black tea drinkers.

Black Tea and Antioxidants

Black tea contains ten times more antioxidants than found in fruits and vegetables. Black tea is rich in polyphenols, an important antioxidant which destroys the harmful free radicals formed as a result of metabolism. These free radicals are cell damagers, which can lead to blood clots, cancer and atherosclerosis. Thus, antioxidants from tea help protect our cells from damage.

Gastrointestinal Benefits

Black tea is also known to relieve diarrhea and maintain the health of the digestive tract because of the tannins it contains. The tannins in black tea decrease intestinal activity and release an antidiarrheal effect on the digestive tract, which helps alleviate the pain associated with diarrhea. Steeping black tea for a complete 15 minutes and then drinking it unsweetened is a popular diarrhea remedy.

Weight Loss Benefits

Is there any link between black tea benefits and weight loss? Well apparently there is a connection. Tea accelerates the weight loss process by boosting the body’s metabolism rate. Moreover, it also blocks the fattening effects of carbohydrates.

Pregnancy

Tea contains a small amount of caffeine which is not good for the developing fetus as its underdeveloped metabolism cannot handle caffeine. However, most doctors say that having a cup of black tea everyday in moderation is not harmful. To be safe it’s better to consume only limited amounts of tea during pregnancy. Moreover, don’t forget to consult your gynecologist regarding this issue.

Hair Care

Rinsing your hair with black tea helps darken the hair and add shine to it. To add shine to the hair, people generally brew two cups of black tea and rinse dampened shampoo hair. The tea rinse also helps increase bulk of hair, slows down hair fall and enhances hair growth.

Skin Care

Black tea is a wonderful astringent. To tap this benefit all one has to do is prepare some black tea and splash the warm tea onto your face. It’s effect is fantastic! Moreover, tea is also beneficial if you are struggling with face or body acne. Black tea can be used on skin portions where you know a pimple is about to erupt. Just steep a black tea teabag in hot water and when it has cooled down, place it over the blemish for 10 minutes. Then, remove the teabag and do not rinse the tea off the blemish. The tea will work and heal the blemish.

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What has changed since Colonial times? The time when Britain and the US made hunting a fashionable trend among members of the white privileged classes. The only change is fb, Facebooking their ‘big game’. Imagine if this was an African woman in Texas, posing next to her ‘big game’ of cats and dogs…

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It goes on to say that Fisher “has been encouraging every one of her friends to visit Africa, promising that it would change their Facebook profile photos as well.”

I was once Angela Fisher. But I’m not any more.

I HAVE PARTICIPATED IN not one but three separate, and increasingly disillusioning, international health brigades, short-term visits to developing countries that involve bringing health care to struggling populations.

Such trips—critically called voluntourism—are a booming business, even though they do very little advertising and charge people thousands of dollars to participate.

How do they attract so many paying volunteers?

Photography is a big part of the answer. Voluntourism organizations don’t have to advertise, because they can crowdsource. Photography—particularly the habit of taking and posting selfies with local children—is a central component of the voluntourism experience. Hashtags like #InstagrammingAfrica are popular with students on international health brigades, as are #medicalbrigades, #globalhealth, and of course the nostalgic-for-the-good-days hashtag #takemeback.

It was the photographs posted by other students that inspired me to go on my first overseas medical mission. When classmates uploaded the experience of themselves wearing scrubs beside adorable children in developing countries, I believed I was missing out on a pivotal pre-med experience. I took over 200 photos on my first international volunteer mission. I modeled those I had seen on Facebook and even pre-meditated photo opportunities to acquire the “perfect” image that would receive the most Likes.

Over time, I felt increasingly uncomfortable with the ethics of those photographs, and ultimately left my camera at home. Now, as an insider, I see three common types of photographs voluntourists share through social media: The Suffering Other, The Self-Directed Samaritan, and The Overseas Selfie…

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Black and Muslim: Double Jeopardy

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